Text 29 Mar 1 note

Anonymous asked: When will you post more stuff???

Was busy with something else, really sorry. Some things on the way already tomorrow! 

Video 19 Feb 66 notes

One of the most famous mummies of the Taklamakan Desert is that of “Cherchen Man”. This European’s body was placed in a poplar-wood box, lowered into narrow shaft grave and left for eternity. His body dates back to 1000 BC and DNA analysis has shown that he was a Celt.

Cherchen Man or Chärchän Man is a mummy discovered near the town of Qiemo (Cherchen) in the Taklamakan Desert, Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region, western China. Cherchen Man “died around 1000 BC”. The mummy is described as: a 3,000 year old male, “6-foot-6-inch giant with Caucasian features”, with hair that is “reddish brown flecked with grey, framing high cheekbones”, an “aquiline” “long nose, full lips and a ginger beard”, whose face is tattooed with “yellow and purple patterns”, it wears “a red twill tunic and tartan leggings”; it is also described as looking “like a Bronze Age European”, “a Celt”. The Tarim Basin mummies are not limited to men. A female mummy was also found and is called Cherchen Woman.

 More interesting stories on the The Tarim River Basin Mummies are here - http://ladyvirag.wordpress.com/felt-items-throughout-history-project-the-tarim-river-basin-mummies/

Photo 19 Feb 129 notes Mourning jewelry containing a finger bone from the deceased.

Mourning jewelry containing a finger bone from the deceased.

Photo 19 Feb 317 notes This original “Jack-o-lantern” made from a turnip in the early 19th century is on exhibit at the Museum of Country Life in Ireland. 

The origin of Jack o’ Lantern carving is uncertain. The carving of vegetables has been a common practice in many parts of the world, with gourds being the earliest plant species domesticated by humans c. 10,000 years ago, primarily for their carving potential. Gourds were used to carve lanterns by the Maori over 700 years ago, with the Māori word for a gourd also used to describe a lampshade. There is a common belief that the custom of carving jack-o’-lanterns at Hallowe’en originated in Ireland, where turnips, mangelwurzel or beets were supposedly used. According to historian Ronald Hutton, in the 19th century, Hallowe’en guisers in parts of Ireland and the Scottish Highlands commonly used jack-o’-lanterns made from turnips and mangelwurzels. They were “often carved with grotesque faces to represent spirits or goblins”. In these areas, 31 October–1 November was known as Samhain and it was seen as a time when spirits or fairies were particularly active. Hutton says that they were also used at Hallowe’en in Somerset (see Punkie Night) during the 19th century. Christopher Hill also writes that “jack-o’-lanterns were carved out of turnips or squashes and were literally used as lanterns to guide guisers on All Hallows’ Eve.” Some claim that the Jack-o’-lanterns originated with All Saints’ Day (1 November) / All Souls’ Day (2 November) and represented Christian souls in purgatory. Bettina Arnold writes that they were sometimes set on windowsills to keep the harmful spirits out of one’s home. An 1834 account of a Halloween night at a house in Ireland makes no mention of any jack-o’-lantern or carved vegetables acting as lanterns, nor does Robert Burns mention them in his famous poem “Halloween”. Thomas Johnson Westropp does not mention them in Folklore of Clare (1910) and an “internationally accepted authority on Irish folk tradition”, Seán Ó Súilleabháin, does not mention them in Irish Folk Custom and Belief (1967). So despite the commonly held belief that the carving of the Jack-O’-Lantern was an ancient Irish custom, no scholarly research into Irish mythology and customs includes a contemporary reference to such a practice being present during Samhain.

There is however evidence that turnips were used to carve what was called a “Hoberdy’s Lantern” in Worcestershire, England at the end of the 18th century. The folklorist Jabez Allies recalls how

“ In my juvenile days I remember to have seen peasant boys make, what they called a ” Hoberdy’s Lantern,” by hollowing out a turnip, and cutting eyes, nose, and mouth therein, in the true moon-like style ; and having lighted it up by inserting the stump of a candle, they used to place it upon a hedge to frighten unwary travelers in the night.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack-o%27-lantern

This original “Jack-o-lantern” made from a turnip in the early 19th century is on exhibit at the Museum of Country Life in Ireland. 

The origin of Jack o’ Lantern carving is uncertain. The carving of vegetables has been a common practice in many parts of the world, with gourds being the earliest plant species domesticated by humans c. 10,000 years ago, primarily for their carving potential. Gourds were used to carve lanterns by the Maori over 700 years ago, with the Māori word for a gourd also used to describe a lampshade. There is a common belief that the custom of carving jack-o’-lanterns at Hallowe’en originated in Ireland, where turnips, mangelwurzel or beets were supposedly used. According to historian Ronald Hutton, in the 19th century, Hallowe’en guisers in parts of Ireland and the Scottish Highlands commonly used jack-o’-lanterns made from turnips and mangelwurzels. They were “often carved with grotesque faces to represent spirits or goblins”. In these areas, 31 October–1 November was known as Samhain and it was seen as a time when spirits or fairies were particularly active. Hutton says that they were also used at Hallowe’en in Somerset (see Punkie Night) during the 19th century. Christopher Hill also writes that “jack-o’-lanterns were carved out of turnips or squashes and were literally used as lanterns to guide guisers on All Hallows’ Eve.” Some claim that the Jack-o’-lanterns originated with All Saints’ Day (1 November) / All Souls’ Day (2 November) and represented Christian souls in purgatory. Bettina Arnold writes that they were sometimes set on windowsills to keep the harmful spirits out of one’s home. An 1834 account of a Halloween night at a house in Ireland makes no mention of any jack-o’-lantern or carved vegetables acting as lanterns, nor does Robert Burns mention them in his famous poem “Halloween”. Thomas Johnson Westropp does not mention them in Folklore of Clare (1910) and an “internationally accepted authority on Irish folk tradition”, Seán Ó Súilleabháin, does not mention them in Irish Folk Custom and Belief (1967). So despite the commonly held belief that the carving of the Jack-O’-Lantern was an ancient Irish custom, no scholarly research into Irish mythology and customs includes a contemporary reference to such a practice being present during Samhain.

There is however evidence that turnips were used to carve what was called a “Hoberdy’s Lantern” in Worcestershire, England at the end of the 18th century. The folklorist Jabez Allies recalls how

“ In my juvenile days I remember to have seen peasant boys make, what they called a ” Hoberdy’s Lantern,” by hollowing out a turnip, and cutting eyes, nose, and mouth therein, in the true moon-like style ; and having lighted it up by inserting the stump of a candle, they used to place it upon a hedge to frighten unwary travelers in the night.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack-o%27-lantern

Photo 19 Feb 55 notes Bonaventure Cemetery, photo by Dick Bjornseth

Bonaventure Cemetery, photo by Dick Bjornseth

Photo 19 Feb 122 notes Mary Queen of Scots, Death Clock,The original engraved dial with 18th century modified to a balance-spring movement by J. Moysan of Blois, France. Timepieces were formerly an apt reminder that your time on earth grows shorter with each passing minute. Public clocks would be decorated with mottos such as ultima forsan (“perhaps the last” [hour]) or vulnerant omnes, ultima necat (“they all wound, and the last kills”). Even today, clocks often carry the motto tempus fugit, “time flies.”

Mary Queen of Scots, Death Clock,The original engraved dial with 18th century modified to a balance-spring movement by J. Moysan of Blois, France. Timepieces were formerly an apt reminder that your time on earth grows shorter with each passing minute. Public clocks would be decorated with mottos such as ultima forsan (“perhaps the last” [hour]) or vulnerant omnes, ultima necat (“they all wound, and the last kills”). Even today, clocks often carry the motto tempus fugit, “time flies.”

Photo 8 Feb 174 notes

Design crafted by Prashanth Kamalakanthan. Powered by Tumblr.