Photo 19 Aug 16 notes Clathrus archerii - commonly known as Octopus Stinkhorn, is indigenous to Australia and Tasmania and an introduced species in Europe, North America and Asia. The young fungus erupts from a suberumpent egg by forming into four to seven elongated slender arms initially erect and attached at the top. The arms then unfold to reveal a pinkish-red interior covered with a dark-olive spore-containing gleba. In maturity it smells of putrid flesh.

Clathrus archerii - commonly known as Octopus Stinkhorn, is indigenous to Australia and Tasmania and an introduced species in Europe, North America and Asia. The young fungus erupts from a suberumpent egg by forming into four to seven elongated slender arms initially erect and attached at the top. The arms then unfold to reveal a pinkish-red interior covered with a dark-olive spore-containing gleba. In maturity it smells of putrid flesh.

Photo 19 Aug 30 notes In Sweden, archaeologists have discovered a gold Roman coin at the site of a brutal, 1,500-year-old murder.
ÖLAND, SWEDEN—For three years archaeologists have been digging at a site on the island of Öland looking for evidence of the Migration Period of Scandinavian history, between A.D. 400 to 550. According to a report in the Local, the team recently found the first Roman gold coin to be uncovered in an archaeological context on the site. The coin, a denomination called a solidus, was discovered in a house where several people had been killed. Researchers believe that it may have been dropped and left behind by thieves who had come to rob the house, and then murdered its residents. “I think that the money was a good excuse to end a feud. So there was probably a feud, this was a very strong statement, not just a normal robbery—an excruciatingly evil statement to kill these people and just leave them,” project manager Helena Victor told the paper.
Source: http://www.archaeology.org/news/2445-140819-roman-gold-coin-sweden-oland-massacre

In Sweden, archaeologists have discovered a gold Roman coin at the site of a brutal, 1,500-year-old murder.

ÖLAND, SWEDEN—For three years archaeologists have been digging at a site on the island of Öland looking for evidence of the Migration Period of Scandinavian history, between A.D. 400 to 550. According to a report in the Local, the team recently found the first Roman gold coin to be uncovered in an archaeological context on the site. The coin, a denomination called a solidus, was discovered in a house where several people had been killed. Researchers believe that it may have been dropped and left behind by thieves who had come to rob the house, and then murdered its residents. “I think that the money was a good excuse to end a feud. So there was probably a feud, this was a very strong statement, not just a normal robbery—an excruciatingly evil statement to kill these people and just leave them,” project manager Helena Victor told the paper.

Source: http://www.archaeology.org/news/2445-140819-roman-gold-coin-sweden-oland-massacre

Photo 19 Aug 17 notes Expert leggers Daniel Jinks and Ernest Wood. The two men demonstrate the process of ‘legging’ through Barnton Tunnel on the Trent and Mersey Canal in northern England. Early canal tunnels had no tow-paths, so to propel the boat through the tunnel two people had to lay on their backs on the boat, and push the boat along using their feet on wall of the tunnel. The Barnton Tunnel was over 500 yards long.

Expert leggers Daniel Jinks and Ernest Wood. The two men demonstrate the process of ‘legging’ through Barnton Tunnel on the Trent and Mersey Canal in northern England. Early canal tunnels had no tow-paths, so to propel the boat through the tunnel two people had to lay on their backs on the boat, and push the boat along using their feet on wall of the tunnel. The Barnton Tunnel was over 500 yards long.

Photo 19 Aug 17 notes Large tumor in the neck, stretched across the back, accompanied by a scoliotic deformity which ended in a tail.

Large tumor in the neck, stretched across the back, accompanied by a scoliotic deformity which ended in a tail.

Photo 19 Aug 19 notes An amusing erotic ivory carving of a monk (1800 to 1900 England)

An amusing erotic ivory carving of a monk (1800 to 1900 England)

Photo 19 Aug 34 notes Jane Toppan “Jolly Jane” - One of the most prolific female serial killers who killed over 70 people. She thought of herself as “the Angel of Death” for good reason. She experimented on patients with atropine, strychnine and morphine. At that time serial killers were barely known. Jack the Ripper was probably one of the few references available at that time. She was one of the first New England serial killers.
More facts here - http://www.serialkillers.ca/jane-toppan/

Jane Toppan “Jolly Jane” - One of the most prolific female serial killers who killed over 70 people. She thought of herself as “the Angel of Death” for good reason. She experimented on patients with atropine, strychnine and morphine. At that time serial killers were barely known. Jack the Ripper was probably one of the few references available at that time. She was one of the first New England serial killers.

More facts here - http://www.serialkillers.ca/jane-toppan/

Photo 19 Aug 20 notes Crash test dummy, Science museum, London.

Crash test dummy, Science museum, London.


Design crafted by Prashanth Kamalakanthan. Powered by Tumblr.